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Vitamin D supplements significantly reduce Ki67 in prostate cancer cells

Posted on: April 10, 2012   by  John Cannell, MD

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5(OH)DFor decades, scientists have been trying to increase the amount of activated vitamin D in cancer cells, in the hope that it will slow cancer’s growth, without causing high blood calcium at the same time. In many ways, activated vitamin D is the ideal anticancer drug, as it forces cells to die when they are supposed to do so (apoptosis) and it increases specialization (differentiation) of cells, unlike cancer cells that try to avoid dying and are often highly undifferentiated.

Although many cancers destroy the vitamin D system as soon as they can, not all cancers do. That is, some cancer cells retain both the enzymes and the receptors needed for the vitamin D system to work. Therefore, beginning in the 1980s, the search was on for an activated vitamin D-like molecule that would go inside cancer cells but not cause high blood calcium at the same time.

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2 Responses to Vitamin D supplements significantly reduce Ki67 in prostate cancer cells

  1. eelisabethpuur@gmail.com

    I still don´t get why they use the active calcitriol form. I just can´t get this question about money out of my head. When D3 is so cheap?
    Do I understand it right? … they have one group with soy, one with calcitriol and one with the combination? but no group with D3? what happend in the calcitriol-group? If the risk of hypercalcemia is bigger with calcitriol, and everyone knows it, why use it?

    Look at this; “Soy increases the bioavailability of endogenous and administered calcitriol, thereby enhancing its anticancer effects and risk of hypercalcemia. Since both agents are easily available as dietary supplements, the increased potential for hypercalcemic toxicity becomes an important factor when considering the combined use of vitamin D and soy in PCa therapy.”

    Firts they talk about the activated, the calcitriol, but in the end they talk about soy and vitamin D, do they mean vitamin-over-the-counter-D3? as the calcitriol is a prescription drug …
    I know it´s a mouse study … but … who paid for this study?

    http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Supplements/soy_vitamin_d_prostate_cancer_0414120325.html

    These supplements fight prostate cancer
    04/14/2012 20:24:00admin
    These supplements fight prostate cancer

    By David Liu, PHD

    Saturday April 14, 2012 (foodconsumer.org) — Vitamin D and soy may have a protective effect against prostate cancer and a new study in the March 27, 2012 issue of the journal Prostate suggests that a combination of vitamin D in the active form 1,25(OH)(2)D can be enlisted to prevent or treat prostate cancer.

    The study led by J.Y. Wang and others from Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford California found that combination treatments based on soy and calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D resulted in substantially greater inhibition of tumor growth than either soy or calcitriol in athymic male nude mice bearing PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts.

    In the study, the mice received diets containing 10 or 20% of calories from soy, calcitriol injections or a combination of soy and calcitriol. The mice were monitored for their tumor growth, serum levels of a,25(OH)(2)D and calcium and regulation of tumor gene expression.

    The researchers found the following:

    “Soy diets alone caused a modest elevation in serum 1,25(OH)(2) D, whereas the calcitriol-soy combinations led to substantially elevated serum 1,25(OH)(2) D, hypercalcemia, and in some cases lethal toxicity. The combinations enhanced calcitriol activity in regulating target gene expression, including greater up-regulation of anti-proliferative (p21, IGFBP-3) and pro-apoptotic (Bax) genes, increased inhibition of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) and cell cycle promoting (cyclin D1) genes, and suppression of prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and signaling (COX-2, 15-PGDH, PG receptors). Increases in serum calcium were accompanied by elevated expression of intestinal calcium absorption genes (TRPV6, calbindin-9k).”

    They concluded that

    “Soy increases the bioavailability of endogenous and administered calcitriol, thereby enhancing its anticancer effects and risk of hypercalcemia. Since both agents are easily available as dietary supplements, the increased potential for hypercalcemic toxicity becomes an important factor when considering the combined use of vitamin D and soy in PCa therapy.”

    Using calcitriol, which is only available through doctors, is risky because this active form of vitamin D unlike the form of vitamin D sold as dietary supplements can have a direct influence on many physiological functions. One common risk of hypercalcemia, which is a common concern associated with use of vitamin D. It’s well recognized that high doses of vitamin D may be used to fight cancer, but the potential risk is hypercalcemia.

    There are many things a man can do to reduce his risk of prostate cancer. The cancer is generally growing fairly slowly and a man older than 70 may be more likely to die from another disease. For that reason, men may be better off not receiving any screening and treatment, which can do more harm than good for men ages 70 or older.

  2. Umileritac@aol.com

    The oncologist rarely hesitates at treating cancer with chemotherapy, regardless of the plentiful negative side effects. It seems to me that these side effects from chemotherapy are considered “a given” by the oncologist. It is like an unspoken dilemma: you have cancer–do you want to have the potentially deadly treatment or to potentially die from the cancer? Enter Vitamin D3 and all its benefits….Why would any sane doctor fight its use, even at very high levels? Certainly there is the risk of hypercalcemia. But, what treatment is risk free?

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