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Vitamin D derivative may improve the efficacy of chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer

Posted on: September 30, 2014   by  Amber Tovey

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In an exciting and innovative new study from the journal Cell, researchers have discovered that a synthetic derivative of vitamin D may improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy used to treat tumors in those with pancreatic cancer.

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1 Response to Vitamin D derivative may improve the efficacy of chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer

  1. IAW

    So “In this study, the researchers used the analogue, calcipotriol (Cal), which is a synthetic derivative of calcitriol, or the activated form of vitamin D. Both calcitriol and Cal are able to bond to the vitamin D receptors (VDRs)”. So they could have used the calcitriol for the study?

    “This research does not suggest that normal vitamin D supplementation has the same effect, and the researchers even examined this and found that standard supplements did not work.” Since I cannot access the full text, it would be great to know how they decided that “standard supplements did not work”. How did they reach this conclusion?

    I also predict that some day they will realize/prove that a lot of excess fibrosis/scar tissue formation in general will be linked to low vitamin d levels. I think the body when not vitamin d replete, can go “haywire” as it tries to affect repairs without enough vitamin d.

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