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I've began to supplement Vitamin d3&k2 combo. D3:3000IE / K2: 45ug. I felt great the first month, my sleep decreased like 2 hours in total by first day and i still felt energized, it further decreased 2 hours after a month and i felt tired, got insomnia for a while so i started use even more magnesium. 1600mg of magnesium citrate&lysin chelate= 486mg elemental, wasn't enough. So i used chloride magnesium and that saved my insomnia so i can fall asleep, that gives probably atleast 2000 elemental with my rub, an ounce gives 3262mg elemental magnesium!. I still have problems sleeping a whole night. I go to bed at 9 and waking up at 3 and are tired, thirsty and having a headache usually. I thought to myself that i got hypercalcemia due to my symptoms. I did use alot of calcium as supplement because i couldn't fall asleep without it either, so i guess my whole mineral supplies are unbalanced to say the least. I did however had no issues with supplements before i introduced vitamin d3 to my diet. Am i sensitive to the type of vitamin d3 in my supplement? Are there different vitamin d3 sources? Should i stick to a lower dose?

Asked by  Anton Mullis on December 10, 2015

Answers
  •  Anton Mullis on

    See title

    Answered by  Anton Mullis on
  •  IAW on

    I am not a doctor or scientist. I really think you have hypercalcemia. You have most of the symptoms. Sometimes too much Vitamin D can cause it and sometimes there is an underlying issue causing it and the Vitamin D then makes it worse The 3000iu is not a huge amount but even that could cause a problem under these circumstances.
    So you should absolutely STOP taking all Vitamin D for now and I would say cut way back on the minerals maybe even stop them for awhile. (I don’t know what mineral overload will do?) I would wait until everything goes back to normal, like it was before taking Vitamin D.
    Can I assume that you never had your Vitamin D levels measured? Can I assume you do not live somewhere sunny and may get enough D that way and you really did not need to take any? Did you have any medical conditions before you started taking the D?
    After that you should probably seek medical attention if you can and tell them what happened. If they are a good doctor, I would assume they would look for an underlying issue that caused the hypercalcemia. I suppose there is a chance that you simply do not need much Vitamin D.

    Answered by  IAW on
  •  Anton Mullis on

    Okey, i didn’t take any today and will wait it out for a time. I never had my D-levels tested but i suspected there was something wrong with my body, had ibs and it practicly went away with d-vitamin or magnesium i’m not sure. Also i felt happier than before, i used to be depressed from time to time. Also i live in Sweden, and we barely have any sun here in winter. This summer was really bad and barely gave any good amounts of sunny days. Medical condition would be IBS before i took D-vitamin & higher doses of magnesium. Nothing else. I’m thinking about waiting abit before going to the doctor, because i’ve been on a hair mineral analysis. I will provide my results withing 2 weeks. So even the therapist will ensure i get the correct doses of supplements to help me reach mineral balance. And after few months i will get back to them and they analyze my status. I know they only get to know my minerals and this D-vitamin will may show an correlation between it’s synergies and antagonists so they can maybe see if i need supplement or not. If my symptoms doesn’t go away i will visit the doctor for sure.

    Answered by  Anton Mullis on
  •  IAW on

    I do not know if you will come back to read this. If you figure this all out at some point, I would appreciate if you came back and told me what happened. For example if you use a lower amount of Vitamin D and are fine and your IBS is still better, let me know. It sounds like the odds are you were deficient. The next question is though, maybe you personally do not need much Vitamin D or taking too much or any will cause you to have hypercalcemia.

    Answered by  IAW on
  •  karinahansen198538969500 on

    Oh my do I feel your pain. I live in Denmark, and the sun is just.. meh. Please go to your doctor and have D and PTH taken. If you have hypercalcemia, you could end up having kidneystones.

    Answered by  karinahansen198538969500 on
  •  malsatti76968700 on

    there has been a lot of chatter about NOT taking vitamin d3 without vitamin K2 as they work in concert together ! is this true

    Answered by  malsatti76968700 on
  •  IAW on

    There was a study done in rats that showed Vitamin K “directs” calcium to bones and away from soft tissue where you do not want it to be. It is Vitamin D that helps absorbs calcium from your intestines. So if you do not take or “get” enough D, then you will not absorb needed calcium for your bones. If you do not have enough Vitamin K in your “diet”, then the calcium may not get directed to where it needs to be. So if you eat a well balanced diet, you will be fine.For the “chatter” to say that, is not really fair.http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/vitamin-d-and-other-vitamins-and-minerals/

    Answered by  IAW on
  •  karenjaninaz on

    My Vit D level around 6!weeks ago and tested by my doctor’s lab was 47.1a-after 1 month of D3 10,00 units/day. My goal is ~70nm/ml because I have reactive airway disease and higher levels were reportedly helpful. I took 10,000 the next month, self tested last week and my level is 38. I don’t get it. I also do Vit D lamp. Could the lamp interfere with oral supplement?

    Answered by  karenjaninaz on
  •  IAW on

    Karenj I would have to guess and say if you have medical issues that you may be using the Vitamin D up faster than you can take it. The other thing is if your weight is over 150lbs, then you will probably need more.
    In Denmark Vitamin D is measured as nmol/l and we recommend maintaining healthy levels of at least 50ng/ml which translates to 125nmol/l for you. So 70nmol/l is not your goal, 125nmol/l is.
    Try taking 15,000iu a day. Do you have light skin or darker skin this may have an affect on how much you are getting from the sunlamp?
    Your level must have been extremely low to begin with before supplementing!

    Answered by  IAW on
  •  SMAC195637008300 on

    Hello – I’m wondering if you’ve heard of higher blood levels of VitMin D being associated with increased output of urinary calcium? I’ve experienced an increase in urinary calcium as my VitMin D levels have increased. My blood calcium is fine (9.3 within an acceptable range of 8.5 – 10.1). Parathyroid, thyroid, and kidney tests are all normal. I’ve seen statements that higher levels of Vitamin D may reduce the need for calcium but I don’t know if these statements are based on research or, if true, that the excess calcium would wind up in the urine. My doctor has no answers for me. Thank you for any light you can shed on this!

    Answered by  SMAC195637008300 on
    •  IAW on

      What I do know is that Vitamin D helps calcium absorb from the intestinal tract. Dr. Cannell once said that he felt the high amounts of calcium that were being “prescribed” so to speak, were and are not necessary. For example 1000mg of calcium is not really necessary, more like the RDA or 500mg. Taking enough Vitamin D and not more calcium would correct the problem.
      So I found some interesting information at https://www.betterbones.com/osteoporosis/are-you-losing-too-much-calcium-in-your-urine/. (Granted they are talking about “excessive loss”.) They state “When there’s an unusually high consumption of calcium from diet and supplements, the body simply moves unneeded calcium from the body into urine to get rid of it.”
      This website also states “Excessive calcium loss in the urine can be due to factors like high intake of salt, caffeine, soda, or sugar, low levels of nutrients like magnesium, vitamin D, and vitamin K, and even prolonged stress.” “These factors all promote an acidic pH (which promotes calcium loss), and they’re all things you can begin correcting on your own.”
      I do know that most diets are low in magnesium and probably K. Vitamin K is what moves calcium to bone and not soft tissue.
      Hope this helps!

      Answered by  IAW on
    •  SMAC195637008300 on

      Thank you so much; this is very helpful! My magnesium levels are fine also. In fact, the only abnormal test is the urine calcium output (plus my creatinine output, which is tested at the same time and is following the same pattern as the calcium). I haven’t had my Vitamin K levels tested but I do know I take in more than enough through diet and supplementation. I just don’t know about absorption. Something I should probably check out…. My pH, as tested by urine strips, is generally alkaline. I’m caffeine-free, don’t drink sodas, rarely drink alcohol, eat mostly unprocessed foods, and avoid sugar like the plague. I also take boron, silica and other bone factors and wonder how these affect the need for calcium. Honestly, I question the “need” for the recommended levels of calcium intake once other nutrient, like Vitamin D, are present in adequate amounts. But, as I mentioned, my doctor had no answers. So thank you for this information!

      Answered by  SMAC195637008300 on
    •  IAW on

      SMAC you did not mention the first time around about the “creatinine level” being abnormal. If you are supplementing with calcium, this may explain a lot.
      In light of this new information this study may help at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4198086/. You can also look at https://www.vitamindwiki.com/Hypothesis+%E2%80%93+Optimize+vitamin+D+at+home+by+measuring+excess+Calcium+in+urine.
      I will also say this. Blood levels of any mineral only measure the 1-2% of what is in your blood stream and not total body stores. So you can have a deficit but be with in normal levels. So in light of this, maybe and experiment is in order. Take some supplemental magnesium and see if it changes those levels. (If you do this and it does, please come back and tell me!!)
      So I am not a doctor or scientist and do not want to give bad advise.If your kidney function is fine, that is good. I really don’t think there is an issue!

      Answered by  IAW on
    •  SMAC195637008300 on

      Thank you for this! I wasn’t a aware of the relationship between creatinine and calcium and mentioned the increased creatinine as an aside. It’s urinary – not serum – creatinine, though, that’s increased. I rechecked my numbers and found this: Feb. 2017 – (all within normal ranges except where the upper limit is shown) Vitamin D, 58; serum Ca, 10; serum creatinine, 0.8; urine Ca, 296 (upper limit of 250); urine creatinine, 313 (upper limit of 275). Sept. 2017 – Vitamin D, 66; serum Ca, 9.3; serum creatinine, 0.7; urine Ca, 341 (upper limit of 250); urine creatinine, 382 (upper limit of 275). So the serum creatinine and calcium dropped but the urinary output of both increased. I already take 376 mg. of magnesium in a supplement. Between supplementation and diet, my Ca intake is about 1200-1300 mgs and hadn’t changed between testing periods. I think I should redo the rest without Ca supplements. Thank you again for your response!

      Answered by  SMAC195637008300 on
    •  IAW on

      Yes SMAC I think that would be a good idea. Stop the calcium supplements and redo testing. Let me know what happens!

      Answered by  IAW on

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