I recently fell and broke my hip. While I was in the hospital, my blood test showed 5.1 potassium levels and my creatine was elevated. The doctor was very concerned about kidney failure and wanted to take drastic measures. When I stopped taking my vitamin D3 for a couple of weeks, the blood levels returned to high normal. When I started back up, the levels began to elevate again. My vitamin was at 38. My question is what is the correlation between vitamin d3 and potassium and creatine. Is the elevation something to be concerned about or can it be ignored. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Asked by  Pooh on January 21, 2015


  • John Cannell, MD
    Keymaster
     John Cannell, MD on

    I know of no studies of vitamin D and potassium.

    Theoretically, patients with vitamin D toxicity (which you do not have) causing calcified kidney and renal failure could result in high potassium.

    Answered by  John Cannell, MD on
Answers

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    Besides a broken hip do you have any other health concerns and take any medicines on a regular basis?
    When I check the internet mildly elevated potassium levels start at 5.1 or 5.2. So what is your normal level when you stop vitamin D? Did you mean creatinine or creatine? The first one has to do with kidney function. I assume that is the one that returns to “high normal”? Why they are both elevating when taking D, I do not know. Have you been taking Vitamin D for a long time or just recently? Do you take the co-factors that go with “D”?
    I do not think it would be a good idea to “ignore the elevation”. Vitamin D should only make things better not worse. Look forward to your reply!

    Answered by  IAW on

    • Pooh
      Participant
       Pooh on

      Thank you for your reply. I have Parkinson’s for about 9 years but everything else is excellent. BP runs 100/55 to 127/65, oxygen levels 97-99%, no diabetes. Heart and lungs are good. I am on no prescription drugs.. I take a wide range of supplements and had been taking 5000 units of D3 for about a year . I take only 2000 units now. As I reported my vitamin D3 level was only 38. I keep my Parkinson’s under control with 2 Benadryl AM and PM. I have no symptoms of kidney problems I have read that 2% of t test group showed a false/positive elevated creatinine. I just checked my lab reports and the creatinine went as high as 2.14.

      Answered by  Pooh on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    I do not know how the broken hip got fixed but I would assume your body would use up a lot of Vitamin D in the process. So it would make more sense to me that your levels, potassium and creatinine, would have increased because of this. But you state that “When I stopped taking my vitamin D3 for a couple of weeks, the blood levels returned to high normal.” “When I started back up, the levels began to elevate again.” So I will point your question out to the VDC and see if they have any explanations or advice. It may take them a little while to answer, so keep checking back for at least a week.
    You also said you take a wide range of supplements. Do they match what the VDC recommends to take with your Vitamin D? I am inquiring especially about “magnesium” and what kind if any you take?

    Answered by  IAW on

    • Pooh
      Participant
       Pooh on

      Just a quick note:
      The magnesium I take is called triple magnesium complex. Consisting of magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium aspartate 1200 mg day. I also take k2 and have not seen the suggested list of supplements for D3. Since my magnesium level is only 38, I would like to go back to 5000 units of D3.

      Answered by  Pooh on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    I am not a doctor only a VDC member, so I can’t advise only suggest things or give information.
    http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/vitamin-d-and-other-vitamins-and-minerals. Looks like you take enough magnesium, glad to see the K. Do you take and type of Iodine for thyroid health? It may be in your multi if you take one.
    I will still “point out your question”!!!

    Answered by  IAW on

  • Pooh
    Participant
     Pooh on

    All tests for Thyroid are good.

    Answered by  Pooh on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    If you think all tests for thyroid are “good”, think again. I have read many books and websites by both doctors and patients in regards to hypothyroidism. The absolute consensus is that using just a TSH test to determine thyroid status does not work and just using T4 to treat is not optimal. They promote using Free T4 and Free T3 tests to determine status and using only the upper third of those ranges because those lab ranges are inadequate. The best summary I have ever seen (and just found a week ago) comes from Dr. Henry Lindner. If you click on http://hormonerestoration.com/Thyroid.html it will come to “Thyroid Hormone: T3” an excellent read! If you then scroll to the bottom and click on “Draft of academic paper on the appropriateness of relying on the TSH test to diagnose and treat hypothyroidism” is another excellent read. IT IS THE BEST SUMMARY OF THE ISSUE/PROBLEM I HAVE EVER READ!

    Answered by  IAW on

Recent Discussion

Popular Questions