I note that recent research indicates that too much vitamin D ie more than 100nmol/l results in increased rates of death viz: Professor of clinical medicine Peter Schwarz said: “We have studied the level of vitamin D in 247,574 Danes, and so far, it constitutes the world’s largest basis for this type of study. We have also analysed their mortality rate over a seven-year period after taking the initial blood sample, and in that time 16,645 patients had died. “Furthermore, we have looked at the connection between their deaths and their levels of vitamin D. “If your vitamin D level is below 50 or over 100 nanomol per litre, there is an greater connection to deaths. “We have looked at what caused the death of patients, and when numbers are above 100, it appears that there is an increased risk of dying from a stroke or a coronary. “Levels should be somewhere in between 50 and 100 nanomol per litre, and our study indicates that 70 is the most preferable level. How does the VDC justify recommending levels of vitamin D greater than this figure and why do they say that 70nmol/l is deficient when this study shows it to be optimum? Angus Murray

Asked by  nwjcomp19495400 on October 4, 2015

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