I am suffering from tiredness and fatigue for the past three months. Doctors ran many tests but couldn't find anything. My vitamin D level was undetectable ( below 20 nmol/l). Its now increased to 134 after taking 10,000 iu per day but there is no relief in symptoms. I am also taking 300-400 magnesium citrate and super k2 from lef.org.

Asked by  Jain on February 15, 2015

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  • Jain
    Participant
     Jain on

    See title

    Answered by  Jain on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    So if I have this straight over the last 3 months you have been very tired and fatigued. Now in those same three months have you gone from 20 to 134 nmol/l? I am making sure I have the time frame correct. If so then maybe you just need to wait longer. Even though your blood level is acceptable now, it was “very low”! You may still be repairing a lot of things. You may want to try some more magnesium if you can. Recommendations are more like 500 -700 as long as you do not get loose bowls. You may be a person that needs a much higher blood level in order to feel well. So maybe you might want to try more Vitamin D and see what happens. The “official” safe upper limit is 10,000iu, it is proven that 40,000iu is safe, the upper end of the Vitamin D range is 100ng/ml or 250nmol/l and many of us take more then 10,000iu. If none of that works than maybe you are hypothyroid. If you tell me you were tested and are “fine”, it probably is not true. In that case tell me what thyroid tests they did and the results and I will point you in the right direction.

    Answered by  IAW on

  • Jain
    Participant
     Jain on

    Thanks for the reply. yes the time frame is correct. I will up my magnesium dosage to 700. for the past few days I started taking 15k iu and increased my advance k2 to two capsules. My gastro problems are also increasing, loosing weight lost 6 kg in 3 months. My recent TSH levels are 2.36. My previous result was TSH 1.57, free T4 13.8(pmol/L), free t3 4.2 (pmol/L).

    Answered by  Jain on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    Alright the 1st time around you did not mention any gastro problems and weight loss. So did that begin before starting the Vitamin D or after starting the Vitamin D? In some people Vitamin D intake can cause hypercalcemia. (Even small amounts of Vitamin D.) The symptoms follow:
    ◾feeling sick or being sick
    ◾poor appetite or loss of appetite
    ◾feeling very thirsty
    ◾passing urine often
    ◾constipation or diarrhea
    ◾abdominal pain
    ◾muscle weakness or pain
    ◾feeling confused
    ◾feeling tired
    Your thyroid results are not that well and I will explain in the next installment to your question.

    Answered by  IAW on

  • Jain
    Participant
     Jain on

    Thanks, My symptoms were there but not that bad. I recently had multiple biochemical tests which shows calcium levels 2.45 mmol/l. Everything else also is normal sodium, pottasium, magnesium, urea. When i first had thyroid tests my tsh was below .01 and liver tests were also abnormal ALP 200, bilirubin 28, ggt 80, ast 300, alt 800. But now all the results are normal. When my thyroid and liver numbers were bad I was not feeling that unwell. never took any prescription medicines to treat liver and thyroid and don’t have most of the symptoms you mentioned above.

    Answered by  Jain on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    So in a few short lines I have to try and explain a lot of information. I am hypothyroid and how you diagnose and treat hypothyroidism is not as “cut and dry” as they would lead you to believe. All of the “ranges” they presently use are not very good and there are logical reasons for this. They can be explained at http://www.tiredthyroid.com and Barbara has also written a book that I recently bought and highly recommend but you may not need. Now you posted again and now my understanding is that your TSH originally was 0 .01. This is very “low” especially if you are not taking any thyroid medicine. It shows having hyperthyroidism. Now without explaining further, at the moment, your next levels are “high” even though they are telling you they are normal. At http://thyroid.about.com/cs/hypothyroidism/a/hypoandhyper.htm Mary explains a condition that causes both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. What you probably need next are antibody testing. You can research the following: TPO, Tgab, Tsab or TSI, Trab or TBII tests.
    To understand “normal” TSH levels I would refer you to this study http://press.endocrine.org/doi/full/10.1210/jc.2007-2674 (full text article) entitled Free Triiodothyronine Has a Distinct Circadian Rhythm That Is Delayed but Parallels Thyrotropin Levels. Within it is this graph http://press.endocrine.org/na101/home/literatum/publisher/endo/journals/content/jcem/2008/jcem.2008.93.issue-6/jc.2007-2674/production/images/large/zeg0060858410001.jpeg (graph). This is a study that shows normal TSH levels over 24 hours range from about a low of 1.2 – 2.5mU/l. Notice when they are actually high and when they actually go low. Then match up your Free T3 and Free T4 for a “normal” group of people. They were low.
    So Vitamin D deficiencies can cause autoimmune attacks which may be what you are having. I would seek further testing and would keep taking the D. Hope I am wrong but at least you have something to inquire about. Questions just ask!

    Answered by  IAW on

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