How do humans ‘make’ vitamin D in the skin?

Asked by  Anonymous on October 13, 2014

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  • Anonymous
    Keymaster
     Anonymous on
    Answered by  Anonymous on

  • Jeff Nicklas
    Keymaster
     Jeff Nicklas on

    That is a great question. Humans have a special form of cholesterol in our skin which is stimulated by sunlight. Ultraviolet B wavelengths act to convert this cholesterol into previtamin D which is then turned into vitamin D.

    The vitamin D binds to protein in your bloodstream to be carried to liver where it is made into the inactive form of vitamin D, 25(OH)D. 25(OH)D then travels to your kidney and other cells and tissues to be activated and used.

    Answered by  Jeff Nicklas on
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  • doverman53
    Participant
     doverman53 on

    How long should you wait after sunbathing to wash your skin? Does soap diminish vitamin D or is just plain water better?

    Answered by  doverman53 on

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