Hello. I am a 25 year old female. I just got my bloodwork done and it says I have slight hypothyroidism, I'm low on testosterone for a female, and my Vitamin D level is ridiculously low. It was measured at 13. What I don't understand is, I am outside ALL the time. I am big into the outdoors. I have light skin, hazel eyes, and live in Arkansas. I've had this deficiency before and I lived in Kansas, but was still a huge outdoor enthusiast. I don't understand why it's so bad. Help?

Asked by  shannon.burhenn46617400 on October 6, 2015

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  •  shannon.burhenn46617400 on

    See title

    Answered by  shannon.burhenn46617400 on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    To start with at the latitude between 35-50 in the USA, no vitamin D (very little) can be made in the months from November to February. So once spring comes then you have a lot of catching up to do. Most people also think that having their face and arms exposed is enough but it is not. You need a large surface area, like your back, and believe it or not you can make more vitamin d lying down because of the angle you are to the sun. When you say you are out “all the time”, do you have an outside job? Again unless you are exposing a large amount of skin, you cannot make enough.
    So do not give up the “outdoors”. Science has already proved we get other benefits from the light spectrum not involving Vitamin D.
    So you need supplements or a sunlamp. You are not in the minority, you are in the majority. This is why the Vitamin D Council exists, to battle Vitamin D deficiency which is causing world wide health issues. Even people closer to the equator are Vitamin D deficient because modern lifestyles do not promote the outdoors.
    Since you are slightly hypothyroid has anyone looked for “antibody levels” or have they just done a TSH test? Hypothyroidism can cause other hormones (testosterone) to be low. Has the doctor told you how to correct the Vitamin D deficiency? Anything less than 5000 iu a day (hopefully he recommended more) is not going to be good enough.

    Answered by  IAW on
  •  shannon.burhenn46617400 on

    No I don’t have an outdoors job, but I guess it’s just weird reading articles about how simple it is to get Vitamin D by being outdoors. I guess it might be more complicated. He’s giving me an extremely high prescription of 50,000 IU for once a week for 12 weeks. And he found out I had a slight hypothyroidism by seeing I have low Free T3. He’s an endocrinologist but doesn’t exactly go with conventional medicine. So I’m being hopeful he knows what he’s doing.

    BTW Thank you for answering. I thought maybe the test wasn’t accurate. How can I be outside all the time and have 16 on my Vitamin D?! I’m glad you cleared this up for me.

    Answered by  shannon.burhenn46617400 on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    Since you live in the USA I can only assume that the prescription will be for D2 and not D3. It is better for humans to take D3. You would be better off getting over the counter D3 and either still take 50,000iu ONCE a week or 7000-8000 iu per day. When you get retested and if your levels are better and we recommend 50ng/ml or slightly higher, then you can probably do a maintenance dosage of 5000iu a day. Since you were so low I would take this all year long or only cut back a little bit for spring/summer.
    You have a great endo if he tests Free T3 levels. If he will check antibody levels you could see if they are “high”. If so then you may have autoimmune issues going on AND Vitamin D will help that.
    If you take all that Vitamin D and your levels do not increase or not by much then please come back and tell me! You should also read http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/vitamin-d-and-other-vitamins-and-minerals/

    Answered by  IAW on
  •  shannon.burhenn46617400 on

    Thank you! No I don’t think I got the antibodies test done, but I’ll bring it up to him next time. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Answered by  shannon.burhenn46617400 on
  •  shannon.burhenn46617400 on

    P.S. It’s Vitamin D 3. Maybe this guy actually does know what he’s doing.

    Answered by  shannon.burhenn46617400 on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    Fabulous!

    Answered by  IAW on

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