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Study: Vitamin D’s effect in MS may be larger than suspected

Posted on: July 12, 2012   by  John Cannell, MD

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Several studies indicate that vitamin D may be helpful in reducing flare-ups of multiple sclerosis (although one trial, using D2, showed little effect). This month researchers from France, led by Dr. Pierrot-Deseilligny, discovered that the vitamin D’s effect in MS may be larger than suspected.

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1 Response to Study: Vitamin D’s effect in MS may be larger than suspected

  1. Ron Carmichael

    (sound of head hitting keyboard repeatedly)
    As long as the researchers/physicians remain (apparently) fundamentally ignorant of such elements as the “natural levels” of vitamin D, the difference between cholecalciferol and ergocalciferol, and to what degree the development of our species has depended on commonplace solar radiation exposure then we are doomed to only see defective studies, flawed and unsupportable conclusions, malevolent advice from “official” panels, and ultimately outright harm to those who stand to benefit the most from true advances in knowledge about how to promote health in humans. Why can no one construct solid, productively useful, vitamin D-effect studies that say, employ a steady intake of 5 to 10K iu/day (or more, for autism, burns, morbid diseases, etc.) of cholecalciferol (with frequent determination of actual 25(OH)D levels, including objective assessments of disease states, over a reliable period of time?

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