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NHANES study finds vitamin D intake higher among high income groups

Posted on: November 28, 2013   by  Vitamin D Council

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What kind of socio-economic factors play into how much vitamin D you might be getting? Recently, researchers from Texas Woman’s University wanted to find out.

They looked at 11,857 adults 19 years old or older from the NHANES 2007 – 2010 database. They excluded anyone who took high-dose vitamin D, so 9,719 participants met their study inclusion criteria.

Researchers found total (dietary and supplemental) intake of vitamin D was significantly higher in high income groups. Income was associated with vitamin D intakes in all ethnic groups, except for non-white Hispanics.

Additionally, total vitamin D intake of non-Hispanic Whites was greater than that of Hispanics and non-Hispanic Blacks.

Nonetheless, 75.4% of the high income group were not meeting the recommended daily allowance, compared to 84.3% of the middle income level and 86.8% of the low income level.

The researchers wanted to point out that total vitamin D intake in this NHANES database was higher than in previous years.

“Encouraging the consumption of foods naturally high in vitamin D and foods fortified in vitamin D, along with supporting the greater use of dietary supplements, would help to improve the vitamin D status in the USA,” the researchers concluded. “Finally, culture-specific interventions are needed to increase vitamin D supplement use and health messages should be specifically targeted to all males, Blacks and Hispanics.”

Source

Moore, C.E., et. al. Vitamin D intakes of adults differ by income, gender and race/ethnicity in the USA, 2007 to 2010. Public Health Nutrition, 2013.

1 Response to NHANES study finds vitamin D intake higher among high income groups

  1. Rita and Misty

    From the last paragraph of the above blog: “Encouraging the consumption of foods naturally high in vitamin D and foods fortified in vitamin D, along with supporting the greater use of dietary supplements, would help to improve the vitamin D status in the USA,” the researchers concluded.

    (sigh) 🙁

    1. Few foods are naturally high in vitamin D
    2. Few foods are adequately fortified with vitamin D (Oh, how I wish this would change)
    3. Yes, supplements are available. But, many folks do not have funds (or rather, do not prioritize funds) to purchase supplements.
    4. How about encouraging appropriate sun exposure?

    (Happy belated Turkey Day)
    🙂

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