Vitamin D Newsletter

Newsletter

Vitamin D and depression

Jesse from Pendelton writes:

 "I absolutely have noticed more of an attitude of wanting to participate in life and less a feeling of "why bother," after a month of increased dosage."

Dear Vitamin D Council:

Thanks for taking time for my e-mail. I heard Dr. Cannell on the radio about a month ago talking about his vitamin D formula and as someone who has been involved in holistic nutrition and natural health most of my life as a layperson, I really appreciate what you do for people, and have upped my D on your recommendation.

  • I absolutely have noticed more of an attitude of wanting to participate in life and less a feeling of "why bother," after a month of increased dosage. I will get my levels tested sometime this year.


Currently I do homecare and my present client/friend doesn't get outdoors at all. She was taking 2000 iu of D per day for general purposes until I spoke with her about Dr. Cannell's radio spot. She upped it to 5000 iu with your formula and said she felt a difference in her mood within a week! Bear in mind this is someone who was on antidepressants for decades and has struggled with depression all that time, despite the meds. She wants to wean herself off her meds and for her to say something has helped her mood is anywhere from extraordinary to miraculous!

Dr. Cannell replies:

 Depression is a serious illness with a known morbidity and mortality and thus it warrants more aggressive treatment than someone in good health.

Tell your friend to keep taking her meds. As much as I like to hear what you said, it is more likely that this improvement in your friend's mood will not be permanent. If she does decide to go off her meds, do it very slowly with the help of her doctor. Vitamin D deficiency is but one cause of major depression; there are lots of others. However, I now recommend that anyone struggling with depression should take at least 10,000 IU/day with frequent 25(OH)D blood tests to assure levels of at least 100 ng/mL (250 nmol/L) and to monitor for toxicity.

Depression is a serious illness with a known morbidity and mortality and thus it warrants more aggressive treatment than someone in good health. Some readers have written that they require 50,000 IU/day to alleviate depressive symptoms, but that should only be done under the care of a knowledgeable physician with frequent 25(OH)D levels, as such doses may cause toxicity.

Page last edited: 07 June 2011