VDC test kit slider
VDC-Banner-new_468
VDC test kit slider
sperti-banner

New study finds vitamin D supplementation does not enhance absorption of the drug Protelos

Posted on: January 10, 2014   by  Jeff Nicklas

img

Strontium ranelate, marketed under the trade name Protelos, is a prescription drug used in the treatment of osteoporosis to reduce the risk of vertebral and hip fractures in postmenopausal women and derives from the chemical element strontium. It is different than other osteoporotic treatments in that it works to both promote bone formation and reduce bone resorption. In other words, strontium ranelate helps bones grow and reduces bone loss.

Strontium is very similar to calcium. Its nucleus is nearly the same size as calcium. Because of this, the body very easily absorbs strontium. There’s also some research that suggests the body metabolizes strontium similarly to calcium.

You must be a paid member to read the rest of this post. Please login or register now.

2 Responses to New study finds vitamin D supplementation does not enhance absorption of the drug Protelos

  1. bacullen@gmail.com

    It is my understanding that other strontium salts, e.g. carbonate, chloride, acetate, EDTA, are adsorbed as completely as the ranelate but were not patentable so Sr ranelate became the choice of Big Pharma.

    WHat vitamin “D” was used for supplementation? Since this appears to be a PHrMA supported study, it makes me think D2 so the results are not surprising.
    BC

  2. Brant Cebulla

    They used vitamin D3. The use of vitamin D2 in study is becoming rare.

Test Your Vitamin D Levels at Home!

Our in-home Vitamin D Test Kit is easy, affordable, and an accurate way to find out your Vitamin D status.

order NOW

We need your help!

We're spreading awareness on Vitamin D Deficiency
Donate NOW
Latest Articles
img
Can vitamin D supplementation increase your risk of adverse effects? This study suggests otherwise.

A meta-analysis of RCTs discovered that vitamin D supplementation did not increase the risk of noncalcemic adverse effects compared to a placebo.

Weekly Newsletter