Low vitamin D levels linked to carpal tunnel syndrome among young women

Posted on: October 14, 2015   by  Vitamin D Council

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Recent research has discovered that women under the age of 50 undergoing surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome had lower vitamin D levels compared to healthy women of similar age. However, this relationship was not found for older women.

MedPage Today covered this study in a recent article. Click here for the details.

1 Response to Low vitamin D levels linked to carpal tunnel syndrome among young women

  1. anniecmars@yahoo.com.au

    I’m an older woman (61) and vitamin D has virtually eliminated my carpal tunnel. In 2008 I was going through pre-op tests for carpal tunnel surgery on my right wrist. I had surgery on my left wrist in 1983 – and yes, I am left handed. At the same time my wonderful GP tested my vitamin D level and suggested a much higher dose than I had been taking as my level had not improved since the previous test. I started reading and researching vitamin D, took 4000 in daily and “eureka” I have not needed surgery! I also take magnesium but is the vitamin D that repairs the carpal tunnel. It is like a warning mechanism -if my D level isn’t high enough, I start getting some tingling in three fingers – increase my D to 15,000 daily for a week or two or until the tingling has gone. I struggle to keep my level above 100 nmol/l and generally take 10,000 iu a day. It was this experience that led me to the wonderful Vitamin D Council website back in 2008 and as a massages therapist my first suggestion to new clients with lots of muscle and/or nerve pain is to request a vitamin D test through their GP. They are virtually ALL in the low ranges and need supplements of vitamin D as well as magnesium.

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