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I know adults should take at least 5,000 i.u. per day, and that they can take 50,000 i.u. for some days if fighting the flu. Our 5-year old son, small for his age, takes 1,000 i.u. per day, and 2,000 i.u. once a week. If he gets the flu, what is a safe increased amount to give him to help fight it? Thank you!

Asked by  jwroman on February 8, 2018

Answers
  •  jwroman on

    See title

    Answered by  jwroman on
  •  IAW on

    Just to give you an idea, the present recommendation of Vitamin D to give to an Autistic child is 150iu per pound. So for example a 40lb Autistic child would take 6000iu a day. A healthy child we usually say is 1000iu per every 25lbs or 40iu per pound which would equal 1600iu a day. If I take 50,000iu and divide by an average adult weight of 150lbs, I get 333iu per pound. If I take that times 40 lbs I get about 13,000iu. So certainly 150iu per pound is safe in the long run and up to 333iu per pound safe for the “short” run.
    If your child is small for their age, my suggestion is that you may want to boost that 1000 iu a day plus the once a week 2000iu to 2000iu a day and see if it changes their growth pattern. Did you ever have your child’s levels tested?

    Answered by  IAW on
    •  IAW on

      I was also going to add that if your child gets frequent colds, that may also be another sign that they are not getting enough D also.

      Answered by  IAW on
    •  jwroman on

      Thanks. I’m a bit confused since the maximum amount to give children without risking too much is 2,000 i.u. according to your website. We never had him tested. His immune system seems fine. He doesn’t get colds often and when he does seems to recover quickly. We’re mostly concerned with him having optimal levels of Vitamin D to better weather the flu season and help him fight it if he gets it. He’s probably around 37 pounds.

      Answered by  jwroman on
  •  IAW on

    The VDC website says for children that “2,000 IU/day per 25lbs of body weight” is the “official” upper limit. The 1000iu equals 40iu per pound so 2000iu would equal 80iu per pound. Let’s use the 37lbs. That means you could give him 1480iu a day or 2960iu a day and you are giving an average of 1285iu a day. (Of course you have to round all of those because vitamin d just does not come in all of these amounts.)
    So originally I was trying to show you that Vitamin D can also be based on a “per pound” basis. The point is some of the literature is made to be easy to remember or deal with and that is why it says 1000iu per 25lbs of body weight. So you could be giving your child anywhere from 1500iu a day (the 1480iu) or 3000iu a day (the 2960iu a day).
    Now above I recommended boosting it to 2000iu a day but I really wanted to say 3000iu a day but did not.
    Now we do recommend testing to “make sure” any given amount will give you a level of 50ng/ml. So had you said his level was 50ng/ml, I may have not pushed the issue.
    I also may have said “What if your son needs a level of 65ng/ml to thrive”? This is an unknown factor at this point. What science does know at the moment is that levels at 40ng/ml and below your chance for cancer and autoimmune disease rises “dramatically”.
    We also know that for “adults” they would have to take 40,000iu a day for “months” before they “may” become toxic. (notice the “may”) So for a 37lb child this would be 266iu per pound or 9866iu a day. The 3000iu is well under that.
    I thought your originally question was “excellent” and since my children are all grown up, I had not thought about the “50,000iu a day for the flu” and what to do for a smaller child.
    If you have more questions just ask!

    Answered by  IAW on
    •  jwroman on

      Thank you! This is very helpful.

      Answered by  jwroman on
    •  IAW on

      Your welcome! 🙂

      Answered by  IAW on

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