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Reply To: Is high dose d3 involved in gene expression? I'm 37 and suffer from a neurodenerative disorder called spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. Based on my research, it is possible to turn off (methylate) the mutated protein that causes this disorder. My issue is i have 7.5% bodyfat. I never get sick. My dental health is amazing. How much d3 do I take?

Home Forums Ask the Vitamin D Council Is high dose d3 involved in gene expression? I'm 37 and suffer from a neurodenerative disorder called spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. Based on my research, it is possible to turn off (methylate) the mutated protein that causes this disorder. My issue is i have 7.5% bodyfat. I never get sick. My dental health is amazing. How much d3 do I take? Reply To: Is high dose d3 involved in gene expression? I'm 37 and suffer from a neurodenerative disorder called spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. Based on my research, it is possible to turn off (methylate) the mutated protein that causes this disorder. My issue is i have 7.5% bodyfat. I never get sick. My dental health is amazing. How much d3 do I take?

 IAW on

Just so you know “upfront”, I am not a doctor.
Vitamin D3 is “involved” in gene expression. So if your body is not getting enough Vitamin D, then your genes cannot function properly.
It says, on the internet, that “spinocerebellar ataxia type 2” is an “inherited” disease? Since I am not a doctor or scientist, I am unsure how to answer your question. In other words if it is “inherited”, then D might not help.
Vitamin D, though, is good for many things. At D levels at and below 40ng/ml, your risk for cancer and autoimmune diseases rises “dramatically”! So there is one very good reason to take Vitamin D and there are “many” more.
When I looked briefly at the “spinocerebellar ataxia type 2”, I found references that B vitamins can have an impact and I also found newer references to Co-Q10 being helpful.
You mentioned “never get sick” and “good dental health” and I assume you do not take any Vitamin D? Do you live at a latitude that you can get adequate or “some” sunshine year round? Low Vitamin D levels are a strange thing because many times they affect people in different ways. For example if my levels are chronically low, then I might get Hashimoto’s thyroiditis which is an autoimmune disease. Someone else with the same level might get a type of cancer.
When you say “high dose”, we here at the VDC recommend person’s weighing an average of 150lbs, take 5000iu a day. We do not consider this high. This should give you a “healthy” level of 50ng/ml. If you weigh more than this, then you have to take more. If you weigh “a lot less” than 150, you may be able to take a slightly smaller amount.
Having said the above, for Autistic children, we recommend maintaining a level of 80ng/ml. I also know that there are doctors using “very high” amounts of Vitamin D to help Multiple Sclerosis patients and having great success.
If you have any more questions, just ask!

Answered by  IAW on

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