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Forensic specialist reviews shaken baby syndrome cases

Posted on: November 5, 2011   by  John Cannell, MD

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It appears the United States is beginning the slow process of righting a horrible wrong. For five decades, any baby with multiple fractures and blood behind the retina in the eye or the dura matter in the brain was proof positive the parents were monsters. Out from behind the crowd comes a courageous forensic medical specialist, Dr. Steven Gabaeff, to say: hold on here; we have, and we are, convicting innocent people.

Gabaeff SC. Challenging the Pathophysiologic Connection between Subdural Hematoma, Retinal Hemorrhage and Shaken Baby Syndrome. West J Emerg Med. 2011 May;12(2):144-58.

I have written about this before, see the following:

My background in zoology always made me ponder that beating a tiny infant is something only violent sociopaths, strung out drug addicts, and pathologically jealous barbarians are likely to do. Beating a tiny helpless infant is simply too much the opposite of the long-ago instilled human instinct to protect such tiny infants.

I have also wondered how such beatings could lead to painless and bloodless fractures. Does that make any sense, that the fractures caused from the alleged beatings are painless and without bruising?

Dr. Gabaeff points to evidence that such fractures, as well as the bleeding in the eye and the brain, may well be the result of vitamin D deficiency. He also points out that violent shaking of the head of experimental monkeys always leads to significant neck injuries, something that is curiously absent in the tens of thousands of cases of “shaken baby syndrome,” syndromes that have destroyed tens of thousands of innocent families.

It will be interesting to compare how long it takes the judicial system to correct a wrong compared to how long it takes the medical system to correct the pandemic of vitamin D deficiency. I predict the legal system will move quickly, as the judges will quickly see that they have been misled by child abuse fanatics, while the medical system must come face to face with a pandemic of autism, asthma and autoimmune disorders that they themselves caused.

2 Responses to Forensic specialist reviews shaken baby syndrome cases

  1. mpittaway

    Dr. Cannell, Would you consider devloping a “widget” that we could use to determine an appropirate supplement level for individuals based on their risk factors, similar to the FRAX tool, or the one used to figure out what preventive health services a person has access to with no-copay? http://www.healthcare.gov/news/factsheets/2010/07/preventive-services-list.html
    It would be really interesting to see how easily people could understand the various issues like latitude, BMI, age, their own ng/mL for D. Mary Pittaway

    • Brant Cebulla

      I really like this idea, and an “App” has been something on our table all year, just not quite sure what kind of “App” is most needed/useful. There are some precautions needed to keep in mind.

      I think there are some increased liabilities associated with telling someone what dose they should take based on a survey, as opposed to the way we currently recommend levels. Right now we present information, and enable people to make their own informed decisions. A widget/questionnaire would be a pinch more invasive.

      Would this widget be on our website or designed for an iPhone/Droid? What are some other things that laymen and health care professionals are looking for and think an App could be of use?

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