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Current Respiratory Medicine Reviews releases issue on vitamin D

Posted on: December 16, 2011   by  John Cannell, MD

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It is rare to see an entire issue of a journal devoted to vitamin D. However, that is exactly what just happened and of all things, it was in the field that dominated my life for two years, back in 2004 and 2005, which was vitamin D and influenza. Now, an entire issue, 12 articles, is dedicated to vitamin D and the lung.

Read what the Guest Editor, Professor Adrian Martineau of the Queen Mary’s School of Medicine in London, said:

“This Hot Topic edition of Current Respiratory Medicine Reviews considers the literature suggesting that vitamin D status is a key determinant of respiratory health. At first sight, the proposition that deficiency of a single micronutrient could be implicated in the pathogenesis of conditions as diverse as asthma, allergy, respiratory infection and lung cancer may seem biologically implausible. However, a large and growing body of evidence from both the laboratory and the clinic suggests that associations between vitamin D deficiency and susceptibility to these conditions may well be causal.”

Isn’t that great. Eventually, scientists will write similar words about heart disease, cancer, autoimmune illness, and, I hope in a few years, about brain diseases like autism. Actually, several authors have already written about brain diseases and vitamin D, such as Drs. John McGrath and Darryl Eyles. It is just that nobody is listening.

The last thing I loved about the 11 articles in this lung journal was that many of the 26 authors are writing about vitamin D for the first time. That is great news. Readers may remember back in 2003 when I tried to peak scientists interest in researching vitamin D.

It was simple enough back then. Unsolicited, I started emailing scientists around the world, telling them vitamin D would change the world of medicine. I saved most of the scientists’ responses, as rude and as threatening as they were. Now, some of these same scientists are writing about the wonders of vitamin D.

2 Responses to Current Respiratory Medicine Reviews releases issue on vitamin D

  1. John

    Pique.

  2. jwgreg9

    Thanks so much Dr. Cannell for all your hard work and perseverance in your work with vitamin d research. From what I little I gather on the subject seems that most experts agree that oral supplementation is the lesser desirable method of raising vitamin d levels. Just wondered what you thought about a vitamin d cream instead of a pill form? Thanks, John

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