Canadians rate vitamin D and broccoli as top two ways to stay healthy through winter

Posted on: November 7, 2014   by  Vitamin D Council

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A national survey released by the Canadian Health Food Association found that Canadians plan to stay healthy and happy by eating broccoli, taking vitamin D, and spending time outdoors.

The Canadian Health Food Association (CHFA) is a major Canadian association focused on natural health and organic products.

During winter, the prevalence of depression and illnesses increase substantially. As the days become shorter, there is less vitamin D available from the sun.

Canada has especially harsh winters. Most Canadians are left without ways to receive adequate vitamin D from the sun through the months of November to February.

Recently, the CHFA aimed to increase awareness about how people plan to stay healthy this winter with a nationally representative survey of 1,545 Canadians.

They found that 69% of Canadians plan to eat more broccoli, while 55% plan to supplement with vitamin D and spend more time outside. Two thirds of Canadians reported that they will exercise regularly.

“Health Canada recently reported on seven crucial nutrients that Canadians consistently miss in their diets, including Omega-3 fats, probiotics, magnesium, vitamin D, calcium, fiber, and vitamin A,” stated CHFA President, Helen Long.

“These nutrients affect our health and are especially important in ensuring our bodies have what they need to perform to their fullest throughout this difficult season.”

Source

Broccoli and Vitamin D top Canadian picks for curing winter blues. Canadian Health Food Association, 2014.

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