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Information on the latest vitamin D news and research.

Find out more information on deficiency, supplementation, sun exposure, and how vitamin D relates to your health.

What is the relationship between the fat-soluble vitamin known as Vitamin D to the water-soluble vitamin known as Vitamin C? I know that the general rule is that if you megadose (or even macrodose) on any other vitamin than C, then you should also megadose in C, and that is the general rule. (By the way, Vit C requires the dietary presence of ample Bioflavonoids and some natural-source selenium, but not a lot of selenium, in order for the C to work.) Yet, are there any finer points to the relation between the two vitamins, C and D, other than the megadose-C-also rule (the Dr.Hoffer rule) that I already know?

Ask the Vitamin D Council

Asked by  piccocentu20946200 on June 3, 2016

Answers

  • piccocentu20946200
    Participant
     piccocentu20946200 on

    See title

    Answered by  piccocentu20946200 on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    One of the premier Vitamin D experts says that “Vitamin D is indeed a vitamin because “insufficient amounts in the diet may cause deficiency diseases”. What we know now is that your diet cannot supply all of the Vitamin D that your body needs and that human beings were really meant to get the “bulk” of their Vitamin D requirements from sunshine. So can we really call it a “Vitamin”?
    This website says”Vitamins are chemicals that are needed by your body for good health” (Using that definition then Vitamin D is a vitamin.) It goes on to say “What makes vitamin D unique compared to other vitamins, is that when your body gets its vitamin D, it turns vitamin D into a hormone.” “This hormone is sometimes called “activated vitamin D” or “calcitriol.”
    The point to this is I have never heard of the “C rule”, I have never seen it associated or talked about at all with Vitamin D and since Vitamin is “not” really like other Vitamins, I would then guess the “rule’ would not apply.

    Answered by  IAW on

  • piccocentu20946200
    Participant
     piccocentu20946200 on

    The Rule or Tradition of pairing all other vitamins with Vitamin C started with one Dr Abram Hoffer.

    (You can look up his name and the phrase “Orthomolecular Therapy”.)

    Hoffer also strongly recommended that one also both have a decent amount of protein in one’s diet and limit one’s sugar intake in order to keep blood sugar (and mood) at even keel.

    The amount of Niacin he used on his patients was freakishly big, and he made sure that his patients also take generous amounts of Vitamin C as a protective buffer when using Niacin, so that the Niacin do its best work.

    Also, there is a tradition of pairing a fat-soluble vitamin and ditto antioxidant, Vitamin E, with C so that the E will do its good work and nothing untoward (and E is a relatively safe fat-soluble vitamin).

    Thank you for responding and expressing your views about the Sunshine Vitamin, D, also known as the Light vitamin.

    Answered by  piccocentu20946200 on