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Information on the latest vitamin D news and research.

Find out more information on deficiency, supplementation, sun exposure, and how vitamin D relates to your health.

I have a genetic/familial disorder which inhibits my body's ability to maintain and use vitamin D. What I have tried: bio-identical hormone therapy, pharmacological Vitamin D2-1.25 MG, and many over the counter vitamin D (both water soluble and oil soluble) with the result being a slightly raised, but still low, Vitamin D level. I live in Texas, and tried getting more sun, which caused skin problems. Thank you for your your work! Susan

Ask the Vitamin D Council

Asked by  susandavey.davey54279300 on June 12, 2016

Answers
  •  susandavey.davey54279300 on

    See title

    Answered by  susandavey.davey54279300 on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    What is the largest amount of over the counter Vitamin D3 that you have taken and for what length of time, that only produces a slightly higher level.

    Answered by  IAW on
    •  susandavey.davey54279300 on

      5,000 Vitamin D 3 I U per day; I have tried both water and oil soluble types of over the counter Vitamin D3, for over ten years, and even tried a prescription of 50,000 I U D2 per week, for two years with no increase in my absorption rate. I also tried a vitamin K supplement, because I once read on a website how low K can also prevent vitamin D absorption. The vitamin K frightened me! I accidentally nicked my hand in the kitchen and it bled, and I saw my blood was obviously too thick, because it pooled like gelatin, so I don’t take the Vitamin K anymore. Thank you for any help!

      Answered by  susandavey.davey54279300 on

    • IAW
      Participant
       IAW on

      First I think you have a misunderstanding about Vitamin K .From http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/vitamins/vitamin-K#coagulation “Abnormal clotting is not related to excessive vitamin K intake, and there is no known toxicity associated with vitamin K1 or vitamin K2.”
      Now I do know that Vitamin D deficiency can cause “thick blood”.
      Vitamin D”2″ no matter what amount, does not raise D3 levels. We absolutely know that Vitamin D3 is better for humans to take because that is what they make.
      I really do not know that much about the possible “genetic” factors.
      I do know that Dr. Cannell once said take 5000iu a day and if that does not raise levels then take 10,000iu a day. If that does not raise levels than take 20,000iu a day and see if that works.
      If you have any kind of intestinal malabsorption issues, then that could affect how much you absorb. Again you would have to take more to overcome that or there is great luck with oral sprays increasing levels when other methods fail.
      If you decide to try and take larger amounts, if you get any symptoms then please come back and tell me. Sometimes high amounts can cause mineral deficiencies and sometimes hypercalcemia.

      Answered by  IAW on

  • hlahore@gmail.com
    Participant
     hlahore@gmail.com on

    There are 6 gene defects which result in less vitamin D getting to cells. Only 2 of these defects result in lower vitamin D. measurements. http://vitamindwiki.com/tiki-index.php?page_id=3439. The other four, which about 30% of the population have, cannot be detected b y Vitamin D measurements. There are various workarounds depending on the exact gene, which you failed to mention.
    By the way, a majority of diseases which run in the family are all associated with vitamin D. http://vitamindwiki.com/tiki-index.php?page_id=7403

    Answered by  hlahore@gmail.com on