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Information on the latest vitamin D news and research.

Find out more information on deficiency, supplementation, sun exposure, and how vitamin D relates to your health.

An unexpected bout of high BP and tachycardia landed me in the emergency room about a month ago. Blood test taken subsequently showed Vit D deficiency (13 ng/mL). I started supplementing magnesium and CoQ10 to calm erratic BP and heart rhythm issues but now need to address Vit D. I saw recommendation of 10,000 iu for several months. Question is how is this going to affect calcium/mag balance, if at all? Thank you.

Ask the Vitamin D Council

Asked by  30julystm47212900 on April 7, 2016

Answers

  • 30julystm47212900
    Participant
     30julystm47212900 on

    See title

    Answered by  30julystm47212900 on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    We usually recommend 5000iu a day of Vitamin D and you should be able to reach a level of 50ng/ml which is what we recommend to stay healthy. We do recommend testing after two or three months to make sure that amount gets you to the 50ng/ml. It will probably take a couple of months of taking that amount of D to do that. The 5000iu is based on an average weight of 150lbs. If you weigh a lot more than this then you will have to take more. (Let me know.)
    I am not a doctor or scientist but sometimes recommend higher amounts if the person is having serious health issues caused by the low Vitamin D.(Please let me know if this is your case.) I usually tell people that the “official safe upper limit” is currently 10,000iu a day.
    You may at least want to start with the 5000iu. If you are not taking enough magnesium then you may start having symptoms which can then be remedied by taking more magnesium.
    As for “balance” I do not think that is an issue. If you are not getting the RDA for these minerals though, then the Vitamin D will not be able to do its job!

    Answered by  IAW on

  • 30julystm47212900
    Participant
     30julystm47212900 on

    Thank you so much for your information. Yes, I’m more that 150 # — about 190. The only health issue I’m aware of is the spiking BP, which is really quite annoying. Otherwise, the lipid issues are fine and (I neglected to mention) I have a passing grade from the family cardiologist, despite the spiking BP. He indicated that there was no cardio reason for the spikes and he had no concern about the condition of the heart. It’s making me crazy, however.

    The only other supps that I’m taking is coQ10 (ubiquinol) and magnesium at 2000 mg/day (the l-threonate).

    Thank you again for your suggestions.

    Answered by  30julystm47212900 on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    I hope you mean magnesium 200 not 2000 a day!
    Instead of the 5000iu you could do 7000-8000iu. General rule right now is 1000 iu for every 25 lbs of body weight. If you take the 10,000iu you will probably just end up higher than 50ng/ml but lower than 100ng/ml BUT don’t hold me to that.
    Everyone should read http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/vitamin-d-and-other-vitamins-and-minerals/.
    The blood pressure spikes could very well be coming from the low Vitamin D. So if after taking the Vitamin D for a while they stop, please come back and let me know!

    Answered by  IAW on

  • 30julystm47212900
    Participant
     30julystm47212900 on

    Actually, it is 2000/day on the magnesium. It’s consistent with the recommendations in Carolyn Dean’s book, The Magnesium Miracle, as well as Mercola. In fact the supplement I’m taking is a Mercola product. The recommendation is for 4K/day, but I’m conservative, so it’s just 2K for me. :-)

    I also have the Mercola Vit D (5000 iu) and Vit K2 (180 mcg) combo. I’m very leery about the K2 because it’s the MK7 and feedback on-line is that it causes palpitations in some people. Well, that’s what got me here in the first place, so I’m thinking I’ll find plain old Vit D at your recommended levels and once some builds up, I might try the K2. Between the Magnesium and (hopefully) Vit D build up I should be able to handle any impulse toward palpitations that K2 might throw my way. We’ll see.

    Thank you ever so much, again.

    Answered by  30julystm47212900 on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    I know the front of the bottle says 2000mg but the back says 144mg. So if you take 4 you get 576mg, 3 = 432 and 2 = 288mg. If it was really 2000mg you would most likely come down with hyper magnesium. It already happened to one person on the Q and A that was taking really high amounts of magnesium. You might want to take at least three.
    I have not heard of the palpitations and MK7. Maybe if some people do not have enough magnesium in their system and then take the the K it causes palps???

    Answered by  IAW on

  • 30julystm47212900
    Participant
     30julystm47212900 on

    M’I bad. Of course. Thank you for clearing that up. But the label says the serving size is 4 caps and Amount/Serving is 144 mg. So, does that mean that for all 4 caps it’s 144 mg? I’m SO confused.

    If it’s only 144 mg for all four, then I don’t need to cut back — in March I took 250 mg/day in an ordinary combo supplement and tolerated it just fine. Now I understand why the results I’ve had so far with the L-threonate have not been as exciting as with the run-of-the-mill supp.

    Thank you for setting me straight. I’ll let you know about the BP spikes after a while on Vit D and I’ll let you know about the K2 (I’m still leery… The palps were definitely NOT fun.)

    I’m grateful that you’re here and will send a modest contribution to help with expenses.

    Answered by  30julystm47212900 on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    Yes, you are right if a serving is 4 then its 144 for the 4. If its claim is that it is more bioavailable then maybe you only need that 4.
    The only thing I usually do is warn people not to get magnesium oxide because it is not as bioavailable as other magnesiums.

    Answered by  IAW on

  • 30julystm47212900
    Participant
     30julystm47212900 on

    You’re awesome. Thanks, again.

    Answered by  30julystm47212900 on

  • 30julystm47212900
    Participant
     30julystm47212900 on

    Having re-assessed the lack of human studies for the l-threonate form of magnesium, I’ve “decided” to stick with the glycinate form for now while I do more research (I’m wary about easy access to the brain, based only on studies in rats).

    In the meantime, I’ve found the following 2014 study that shows that Vit D can be taken transdermally.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3976443/

    Do you know if transdermal application is better than oral supplementation and by avoiding the intestine is the transdermal method safer re calcification issues? (i’m working up my courage to do the K2 [MK7]).

    On average, how quickly can calcification become an issue (understanding that everyone is different)?

    Answered by  30julystm47212900 on

  • IAW
    Participant
     IAW on

    So “no” trans dermal Vitamin D will not help you avoid arterial calcification. In general it is not necessarily better than capsules/drops but those with digestive issues could benefit from that delivery method if not able to absorb through the intestines.
    At http://www.nattopharma.com/cms/cms_upload/file/NPICenter.com%20_%20Vitamin%20K2%20Shown%20to%20Reverse%20Arterial%20Calcifications.pdf it shows the study where they made rats deficient in K to study the “potential to regress calcification”. (There’s those rats again.) So end result was take Vitamin K away and calcification occurs, give Vitamin K back and calcification regressed within a short period of time. So for the rats, at 6 weeks they were already almost 40% better. (Besides learning about Vitamin D at this site you can also learn things like they use rats because believe it or not they are most like us. So results mirror what happens in a human.)
    So if your diet is pretty good and you eat a lot of “greens”, you are probably covered. There is a whole other subject on how Vitamin K1 can also become K2.

    Answered by  IAW on

  • 30julystm47212900
    Participant
     30julystm47212900 on

    Got it. Thank you, again.

    Answered by  30julystm47212900 on